ABOUT THE COUNCIL

The Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations is a strong organization made up of dues paying qualified civic and homeowners associations in our City. Each Member Association sends a representative to participate on the Council. Meetings are held monthly at City Hall every second Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Commission Conference Room. Everyone is welcome.

CFLCA addresses the issues and concerns of the Membership, as well as provides informative speakers on important City and County topics. Members participate on committees that tackle the pressing issues facing our City. Recommendations are brought to the City Commission and the City Manager with the hope of directing them in ways that ensure the needs, prosperity and health of all our Member Associations. Won't you please join us at our upcoming meeting?


Council Corner

CFLCA Consensus Statement on Density

Download CFLCA Consensus Statement V4

Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations

Consensus Statement to City Commission on Development/Density 

The Council of Fort Lauderdale Civic Associations believes that the City of Fort Lauderdale should encourage human-scaled neighborhoods over urban sprawl, multiple transportation modes over automobile dependence and orderly, predictable development patterns that balance growth with neighborhood preservation.

We feel strongly that Fort Lauderdale should:

  • Encourage transit-friendly office, commercial and multi-family residential development within high density, mixed-use activity centers (ex: Downtown RAC, S. Andrews Ave/SRAC) surrounded by lower density/single-family neighborhoods, parks and natural amenities.
  • Discourage unsustainable, inappropriately-scaled development on the barrier island.
  • Continue to explore new opportunities for growth in the Uptown district and along the major identified corridors. However, until planning for a predictable and acceptable level of density and design is agreed on, new large-scale projects should be discouraged or subject to further review.
  • Provide greater incentives for sustainable development that utilizes solar, wind, and other alternative energy sources to power the projects’ needs once built.

With 3 annual Neighbor Surveys pointing to traffic flow/congestion as the single biggest challenge facing the city, increased large-scale development and density should be encouraged only in sections of the city that either presently have the necessary transportation and self-supporting infrastructure (places of employment, shopping, food choices, etc.) in place to mitigate traffic flow issues or in sections of the city where it is planned and financed for the immediate future. For example, the Council would be generally supportive of density development along the phase 1 route of the Wave Modern Streetcar as it would be conducive to place more housing where residents have public transportation options. We also strongly support more transit options to airport, beach and the port to reduce car trips.

Further, we believe that growth and neighborhood strengthening can be accomplished by committing to the following:

  1. We advocate an acceleration of improving neighborhood streets deemed critical for the movement of people by all methods of transportation; specifically sidewalks, bike lanes, crosswalks, lighting, street striping, and details outlined in the “complete streets” model.  We would not be supportive of large-scale residential construction moving forward in any neighborhood unless these aspects of planning are either in place or planned and financed in part or wholly by the developer.
  2. We support promoting distinctive, attractive neighborhoods and local business districts with a strong sense of place, including the rehabilitation, re-use, and protection of structures of importance; specifically, we support emphasizing and protecting existing community assets such as community centers, existing or planned parks, waterway access points and vistas, historic structures, etc.
  3. We support responsible, compatible growth in existing neighborhoods. For example, more needs to be done to preserve the general character of established neighborhoods that have developed over time. In-fill residential development (i.e., duplexes, cluster dwellings, etc.) has often become out of character with the pre-existing built environment and we request a review and modification of height and bulk allowances for new construction on existing lots in residential neighborhoods that are mostly composed of older stock, single family homes. Regenerate and implement the recommendations of the ULDR Modifications Plan as outlined in the Neighborhood Development Review Criteria Project (NDRC).
  4. We want development decisions predictable and fair. While the Council supports flexibility from time to time for truly innovative development proposals that will enhance the community, we would prefer that Staff and Citizen Boards either stop or limit exceptions to our building codes and zoning regulations, especially within or nearby highly established and traditional neighborhoods.
  5. Continue to encourage and foster neighborhood participation as early as possible in development and density placement decision-making.

Agenda For The Next Meeting

Agenda for May 12, 2015

GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING

May 12, 2015 7:00 PM

8th floor Conference Room, City Hall

AGENDA

CALL TO ORDER 7:30 PM

PLEDGE of ALLEGIANCE

ROLL CALL

REVIEW AND ACCEPTANCE: Minutes of the April 14 Meeting*

TREASURER’S REPORT

POLICE/FIRE REPORT

ANNOUNCEMENTS/GUEST INTRODUCTIONS

Matthew Competiello, Secretary for the Tobacco Free Partnership of Broward County.

 REPORTS

Presidents Report

Neighborhood Support ILead Web Site

Web Page Update

Membership Report

Committee Reports

Comprehensive Planning Committee

Report to the City Commission Regarding Density Workshops

NEW BUSINESS

            Cancel the July 14 Meeting

OLD BUSINESS

            Follow Up Discussion on Police Body Cameras

FOR THE GOOD OF THE COMMUNITY

ADJOURN